This web site is currently under a redesign. Thank you for your patience.

JIM MASON

JIM MASON

Jim Mason is an author and attorney who focuses on human/animal concerns. His latest book, co-authored with ethicist Peter Singer, is The Ethics of What We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter (Rodale Press, 2006). The authors trace the foods eaten by three American families back to their sources and explore the ethical questions that arise along the way. The book discusses factory farming and alternatives, fair trade, buying local, organic farming, commercial fishing, and other food matters of concern to consumers today.

His book, An Unnatural Order: The Roots of Our Destruction of Nature (Lantern Books, 2005), looks at the historical and cultural roots of the Western belief in God-given dominion over the living world. In enslaving animals for war and farming, he says, agrarian society broke the ancient bonds and sense of kinship with them. This makes for an alienated, nature-hating culture, Mason argues. It fouls our relations with nature — especially animals, whom we need, he says, “as companions, as exercisers of human empathy and nurturing, as feeders and informers of the psyche, and as kin and continuum with the rest of the living world.”

Click here to learn more about Jim Mason

"Strong feelings for animals have driven the course of my life. From the age of five, when I rescued baby mice from the barn and kept them warm in a shoe box behind the kitchen stove, to today’s work of getting funding to grassroots groups working for animals in rural areas, helping animals has been my joy and my passion. It all began as a child on a Missouri farm and it feeds me today as a writer and attorney in big cities back East. I am a human being who feels deep kinship with my fellow beings. I want to spare them my species’ worst behavior. Although the traditions we fight are old and deep-seated, they are cracking. So many people now are waking to the joys of a sense of kinship with animals and the living world."

Jim Mason

"I feel love, sometimes anger; I feel kinship, sometimes alienation. These drive me to places where I can see and report the sorry ways we treat animals. They push me to places within as well, where I find the courage to write and act against millennia-old traditions that raise one species over all others. I take heart and have hope now. I have acted on my empathy for animals instead of stifling it. I take heart now that there are so many others who are doing the same."

Jim Mason

Herdsman

In enslaving animals for war and farming, agrarian society broke the ancient bonds and sense of kinship with them.
Copyright © 2014 Jim Mason. All Rights Reserved.